Topic: 1914 - 1918

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!--An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.--
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.



One Hundred Years Today.

UNIMAGINABLE.

RIP today of all days .

"Walk with me through the universe, and along the way see how all of us are connected. Feast the eyes of your soul on the love that abounds, in all places seemingly endless, like your own existence."

Re: 1914 - 1918

I knew a simple soldier boy
Who grinned at life in empty joy,
Slept soundly through the lonesome dark,
And whistled early with the lark.

In winter trenches, cowed and glum,
With crumps and lice and lack of rum,
He put a bullet through his brain.
No one spoke of him again.

You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye
Who cheer when soldier lads march by,
Sneak home and pray you'll never know
The hell where youth and laughter go.

R.I.P.

soundcloud.com/unbroken1

Re: 1914 - 1918

My mate from uni used to love this poem. It drove us all mad when he would recite it after 2 bottles of wine but for some reason it has stuck

Those long uneven lines
Standing as patiently
As if they were stretched outside
The Oval or Villa Park,
The crowns of hats, the sun
On moustached archaic faces
Grinning as if it were all
An August Bank Holiday lark;

And the shut shops, the bleached
Established names on the sunblinds,
The farthings and sovereigns,
And dark-clothed children at play
Called after kings and queens,
The tin advertisements
For cocoa and twist, and the pubs
Wide open all day--

And the countryside not caring:
The place names all hazed over
With flowering grasses, and fields
Shadowing Domesday lines
Under wheat's restless silence;
The differently-dressed servants
With tiny rooms in huge houses,
The dust behind limousines;

Never such innocence,
Never before or since,
As changed itself to past
Without a word--the men
Leaving the gardens tidy,
The thousands of marriages,
Lasting a little while longer:
Never such innocence again.

Loop Music Mix Show

http://www.loop-music.co.uk

Re: 1914 - 1918

To quote Blackadder goes Forth

Captain Blackadder: damn sight simpler if we just stayed in England and shot fifty thousand of our men a week.

sad

RIP

Re: 1914 - 1918

steelydan wrote:

To quote Blackadder goes Forth

Captain Blackadder: damn sight simpler if we just stayed in England and shot fifty thousand of our men a week.

sad

RIP

The number of young men who died unnecessarily was a disgrace, Blackadder pretty much hit the nail on the head for me

Re: 1914 - 1918

So many corners of a foreign field that will remain forever England.

RIP

------------
Millsy , you're a board titan and beyond mere platitudes. Your contribution speaks for itself.

niton (Oct 14)

Re: 1914 - 1918

RIPs generally get tossed around on forums like confetti at a wedding but if ever one was deserved it's here.

Rest in peace, and thank you.

Last edited by smashdad (Monday Aug 2014 11:04:42)

Re: 1914 - 1918

Canada was a young nation, having only seen confederation in 1867.  While horribly gruesome, WWI helped unify the young country and served as a nation-building event that brought quite a bit of pride to our young country.  Quite often allied troops would fail to obtain their objectives or hold them, and the Canadians would be called in to clean up and finish the job - which they typically did.  This served as the beginning of our history of having very efficient armed forces, despite their size.

John McCrae wrote this in the trenches after having been chlorine gassed by the Germans.  Despite that, the Canadians still held their line and the Germans were unable to penetrate it. 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
      Between the crosses, row on row,
   That mark our place; and in the sky
   The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
   Loved and were loved, and now we lie
         In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
   The torch; be yours to hold it high.
   If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
         In Flanders fields.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Flanders_Fields

Re: 1914 - 1918

loopdokter wrote:

Quite often allied troops would fail to obtain their objectives or hold them, and the Canadians would be called in to clean up and finish the job - which they typically did.

seriously?

"I am the fucking club" - Flares 19.03.14

Re: 1914 - 1918

chuffer wrote:
loopdokter wrote:

Quite often allied troops would fail to obtain their objectives or hold them, and the Canadians would be called in to clean up and finish the job - which they typically did.

seriously?

Very, actually:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vimy_Ridge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Ypres
http://www.journal.forces.gc.ca/vo9/no2 … ch-eng.asp

Vimy is the biggest one though.